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Apple Strudel

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Our farm supplies a lot of bakeries with apples, including several German bakeries that use our apples in their strudels. These strudels come in a variety of styles and types, but one thing is sure; they all contain apples. Grainharvest Breadhouse is a local bakery that makes an excellent strudel.

A couple of years ago, our church held an international social for all ages, where there were at least ten different food booths to circle around tasting foods from other countries. Our people travel a lot and several have lived in other countries so we had a good pool to choose from. One of “our” Syrian families that we sponsored into Canada also had a booth with their national dishes. It was a fun evening.

Anyway, my contribution to the German table was this strudel. We have visited Germany and with my German contacts, I felt like this was something I wanted to try. A truly authentic strudel has a handmade dough rolled paper thin, but I needed to make a lot of them and it was a trial run, so I cheated and used puff pastry. It must have been good because I even had an eleven-year-old ask me for the recipe!

This weekend I made it again for a retreat we were at with friends and I decided it’s time to share it with all of you. You’re welcome.

First of all, you will need to thaw the puff pastry. This can be done in two hours at room temperature or four hours minimum in the refrigerator. The packages I buy have two sheets of pastry in the box.

I used Golden Delicious and Red Prince apples, but you can use pretty much any apple that holds its shape, yet will soften. Peel and chop the apples and toss them in a mixture of white sugar, flour and cinnamon. Let that sit while you prepare the rest.

While the apples are blending, you can be grinding the bread crumbs and walnuts together finely, then mix them with the brown sugar. I have a handy-dandy KitchenAid chopper that I use for this, but you could use your rolling pin, food processor or blender. Roll out the pastry sheets to a 10″ by 12″ size on parchment paper or a well-floured surface. Spread half the crumb mixture then half of the apple mixture down each pastry sheet. Try to stay back about an inch or more from the short edges. Give it a little more room than I did in the pictures; it was pretty tight. Spread the edges with the egg wash as a glue, then start rolling up the strudel from the long side, using the parchment as an aid. Fold in the ends and tuck them in as you roll.

When you’re finished, seal all the edges tightly and place it on a cookie sheet to bake, picking it up with the parchment and using the same parchment underneath it to bake. Make 8 shallow cuts in the top to allow steam to escape, then brush all over with the egg wash. These cuts can be your guides when you’re slicing it to serve. Sprinkle with fine or coarse sugar and bake.

Apple Strudel
Apple Strudel

 

The Red Prince and Golden Delicious are a good blend for this recipe because the first are tart and the second are mild, so the flavours enhance each other. They both cook and bake very well and are also excellent eaten out of hand.

Golden Delicious and Red Prince apples

As always, the recipe and stories are my own, sponsored by Martin’s Family Fruit Farm.  

Apple Strudel

Ingredients

Apple Strudel
Apple Strudel
  • 1 package (2 pastry sheets) puff pastry, thawed
  • 2 – 3 baking apples (about 2 cups chopped)
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 Tablespoons white sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons flour
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped or ground walnuts
  • 3 Tablespoons brown sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons white sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons dry bread crumbs
  • 1 egg beaten with 1 Tablespoon water for egg wash

Directions

Peel, core and chop the apples into 1/2 inch cubes. Place them in a bowl and toss with the cinnamon, white sugar and flour. Set aside while you prepare the rest of the strudel. Preheat oven to 375°F (191°C). Line cookie sheets with parchment.

Combine the ground walnuts, both sugars and bread crumbs. Set this aside.

Roll out both pastry sheets into two 10″ by 12″ rectangles on a well-floured surface or on parchment. Brush the perimeter of each roll with the egg wash for a glue. Sprinkle each with half the bread crumb mixture and half of the apples, leaving at least about two inches around the edges to seal. Begin to roll up the strudel from the long side, folding in the ends as you go. Pinch all edges tightly to seal. Turn it seam side down onto a cookie sheet, prepared with parchment. Cut eight slits in the top for steam to escape, then brush the top with the egg wash. Sprinkle with coarse or fine sugar and bake for 40 to 45 minutes. The crust should be a nice golden brown and the filling should be starting to bubble out of the slits. Slice through the slits to serve. Each strudel will yield nine generous slices. Best served warm. 

Note: This strudel freezes well. To serve, thaw, slice and set slices on a cookie sheet and heat at 325 until warm, about 15 minutes.

 

 

Sheet Pan Salmon

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Sheet Pan Salmon, ready to eat.

I will confess to you that there has been a veritable conspiracy of events keeping me from posting until now, not the least of which has been a discussion I happened upon on Facebook where the topic was on whether food bloggers should stick with the recipe and cut the chatter. I was dismayed at how many people seemed to feel that a blogger should “just post the recipe already!” Oh, and one person commented that one photo will do, please and thank you very much.

I thought about that conversation long and hard and juxtaposed it against the comments I’ve received from people who have told me they seldom (or never!) make my recipes but they love to read my stories. And the folks (especially inexperienced cooks) who have thanked me for pictures of the cooking steps and found them helpful. AND that my byline is “Telling the stories of the food we love to eat”.  I thought of how much of the food we eat is connected to memories. Throughout this soul-searching reflection, I decided that recipes without chatting are like a journal in which the entries are purely mundane. Like, “I got out of bed this morning, brushed my teeth, made breakfast and ate it, swept the floor, sent the hubby to work and the children to school, did the laundry, vacuumed the floor, welcomed said children and hubby home again, prepared supper and ate it, then everyone went to bed.”  Repeat the next day.  And the next. Exciting reading, is it not? I can’t wait to read it again in 25 years.

Disclaimer #1: You may be able to tell that this is a very traditional household.

Disclaimer #2: I do agree that the chatter should revolve around the recipe. Like this post does, haha.

SOOOO… onward and forward, at least for now. Into every blogger’s life a little rain must fall. Before we know it, blogging will go the way of the dinosaur, and I was barely even a toenail.

This recipe came to be after a conversation in which a newly-diagnosed celiac was despairing of ever having good food again. I recommended my Salmon, Sweet Potato and Apple Roast recipe to her as an example that she could still enjoy lots of great food and promptly felt like making it again myself. I added taco seasoning this time because we like spice and who doesn’t like taco seasoning? I changed up a few other things as well. One new convenience is that it all roasts in one pan, not separately. I’m not sure why I didn’t think that could work the first time. I used Atlantic salmon, which is less expensive but not as good. I have a nice red Coho salmon waiting in my freezer for the next time. That’s my favourite; it has a thinner skin and a less fishy taste.

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There you go, chipped plate and all. Fit for a celiac king.

Next up: Apple Strudel for your Valentine!

This recipe is sponsored by Martin’s Family Fruit Farm. For better or for worse, the blog is all mine. 

All kinds of root vegetables, as well as greenhouse veggies like the spinach and sometimes kale are available at Martin’s, even in the dead of winter. You could use any combination you wish in this recipe.

Sheet Pan Salmon

Ingredients

Sheet Pan Salmon, ready to eat.

Sauce:

  • 1/4 olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice (or concentrate)
  • 1/4 cup honey or maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup fresh parsley (or 1 tablespoon dried)
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard (I like grainy brown Dijon)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 2 – 3 tablespoons taco seasoning mix (I mix my own)

Sheet Pan:

  • 1 1/2 – 2 pounds whole salmon fillet or pieces
  • 4 medium carrots, peeled and thickly sliced
  • 4 medium potatoes, unpeeled, washed and cut in chunks
  • 1 medium red or cooking onion, cut into wedges
  • 2 cups thickly sliced celery
  • 3 cups fresh kale or spinach, washed and cut into pieces
  • 3 apples

Directions

Preheat oven to 450° F or 232°C. Whisk or shake together all the sauce ingredients. Line a large cookie sheet with parchment or foil. Lay the salmon in the centre of it, skin side down. Brush with half of the sauce. 

Toss the vegetables (except for the kale/spinach) with the remaining sauce in a large bowl. Surround the salmon with the vegetables, saving the kale/spinach for later. 

Bake for 20 – 30 minutes, until the salmon flakes easily at the thickest part when you insert a fork and twist slightly and the vegetables are done to your liking. Sprinkle with the chopped kale or spinach to serve. Plate it with half of a sliced apple on the side for an attractive and easy meal, and healthful to boot!

 

Mennonite Dressing (not Amish)

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Mennonite Dressing
Mennonite Dressing

As long as I can remember, dressing has been an integral part of Christmas dinner. This dressing is not the kind you put on a salad. Oh, no! This dressing is the kind you serve with turkey and the works. In fact, it is an important part of the works. Some people call it stuffing, but we never stuffed it into anything except our tummies. It’s hard to find a bird big enough to pack enough stuffing in for 65 people. It’s one of those foods that many people don’t actually have a recipe for, they just keep adding this and that until it “looks right”.

This dressing is yellow with turmeric, rich with seasonings, broth, milk and eggs, and swimming satisfyingly with Brown Butter. Turmeric used to be a non-item in my mind, in fact I used to think of it as a flavourless powdered food colouring, but recently it is being consumed in greater quantities for its perceived health benefits.

Recently, a friend of mine who had grown up Amish (in fact, he wrote a best-selling book about that experience, and a sequel to it is releasing soon) posted about Roasht on Facebook.  As near as I can make out, Roasht is like Mennonite dressing with chicken and gravy all added to the mix, and sometimes potatoes and carrots. That was interesting to me because the Amish dressing, in this area at least, is very unlike Mennonite dressing and usually the lover of the one will not like the other one. Amish dressing is much drier, using less eggs, or none at all, and has weird things like cinnamon and sometimes raisins added to it. At our church, we get both kinds, because we have people of both backgrounds there. There is always good-natured bantering and lots of ribbing going on over the pots of dressing.

There is one common denominator, however, and that is that they both are a great way to use up all those bread ends languishing in your freezer, and they both need butter, lots of it, to serve it up well. You can go back to munching celery sticks and alfalfa sprouts again afterwards to mitigate it, but Do Not Cut Back On The Butter. And Brown Butter poured over the top is the crowning glory. Any good Mennonite will tell you that Browned Butter is the crowning glory to nearly any vegetable or side and even some desserts and icings.

Here are some tips to help you achieve a great dressing.

  1. Use butter, and use enough of it. 
  2. Brown the bread until it’s toasty and golden. It greatly enhances the flavour.
  3. Use the correct proportion of liquid to bread. There is nothing appealing about a soupy mess. Soup and dressing are two different things.
  4. Use some broth in the liquid. I’m convinced on this point.
  5. Make as much ahead as you can. Toast the bread and top it with the seasonings and cooked vegetables so that you only have to add the eggs and liquids the morning of the event. 

 

Mennonite Dressing

 

The stories and recipes are mine, sponsored by Martin’s Family Fruit Farm.

We sell high quality fresh eggs from Pullets Plus, a local company who gathers eggs from area farmers. Many of the chickens are cage-free. 

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Mennonite Dressing (not Amish)

Ingredients

Mennonite Dressing
Mennonite Dressing

 

  • 2 cups (1 pound) butter, split
  • 4 cups chopped onions
  • 4 cups chopped celery
  • 28 cups bread cubes, toasted*
  • 2 teaspoons poultry seasoning
  • 1 tablespoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 1 tablespoon dried sage
  • 2 teaspoons dried thyme 
  • 2 teaspoons turmeric
  • 1 tablespoon dried parsley or 1/4 cup fresh, chopped 
  • 6 cups chicken or vegetable broth* (I use Knorr’s gel packs)
  • 12 eggs, beaten
  • approximately 6 cups milk

In a large pot, melt 1 3/4 cups of butter and saute the onions and celery until they are nearly soft, about 20 minutes. Remove and stir in all the seasonings. Meanwhile, toast the bread cubes in a large roaster or a few pans at 325°F or 163°C for 20 – 30 minutes, stirring several times. Remove from oven and pour the vegetable and seasonings over the pans. This step can be done ahead and kept frozen or chilled.

The day of the event, whisk the eggs, broth and milk together and pour over the bread cubes. Stir gently to mix. You should see just a bit of liquid in the corners of the pan. You may need to add more milk. 

Pack lightly into lined and/or greased slow cooker. Using the Reynold’s slow cooker liners makes for easy clean-up, if you can find them. Grease the liner well. Cook on low for 4 – 6 hours, depending on your cooker. If your cooker is slow, you may want to start it on high for an hour. 

Brown and stir butter over med-high heat in a flat pan until you start seeing a spiral of golden brown appearing in the centre. Pour the browned butter over the dressing just before serving. 

*This recipe can easily be made gluten- free by using gf bread and broth.

**This is a large recipe for a large 6 quart slow cooker. It can easily be halved for a smaller cooker or crowd. 

 

Irish Skillet

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Irish Skillet

I know that some of you are busy roasting your Thanksgiving turkeys, but here in Ontario the aroma of roasting gobblers is but a faint memory tickling our brains and we have settled in to preparing comfort foods before the festive Christmas gourmet goodies are given priority on our tables.

One new comfort dish that I discovered completely by accident these last few weeks was this Irish Skillet dinner. Aside from the fact that it all cooks in one dish, there were a number of things that drew me in.

A. It uses cabbage! I love cooked cabbage.

B. It asks for apple juice. Yes! My eyes perked up at that idea. I can feature our fresh cider.

C. It’s naturally gluten-free, if you’re careful about which beef broth and Worcestershire sauce you use (French’s Worcestershire sauce does not contain gluten). 

D. And finally, it’s Irish! Lots of warm fuzzies here. Because it’s Irish, it gives me license to look at my photos from a couple of years ago when we visited the Emerald Isle. I will share some of them with you as we go along. Here are a few to get started. Ireland possesses a wild rugged beauty and the people match the landscape. 

I mumbled something to my daughter-in-law through my mouthful of the hash about the fact that it’s not exactly the prettiest dish in the world, and she replied that Irish food is not really known for its ascetic beauty, but for its taste. We both agreed that it was not lacking in the taste department whatsoever. I thought of various regional Irish dishes and this pretty much holds true for most of the foods. It tastes amazing, but it ain’t so much for looks. Sorry, Dad! I know you believed that food first should appeal to the eyes before it enters the stomach, and most of the time I agree with you. Here are some food pictures.

I made Irish soda bread to accompany the meal, of course, and it brought back fun memories of the Dublin giant who taught us how to make the bread, tossing the eggs to us as we were ready. Not a single one broke, believe it or not. He also taught us how to dance an Irish reel. He was definitely a highlight of that part of our organized tour. He also informed us that he’s single, for those of us who might be interested in that tidbit. Which I wasn’t, naturally.

The stories and recipes are provided by yours truly, sponsored by Martin’s family Fruit Farm. 

People often ask what the difference is between apple cider and apple juice. In our country, fresh apple cider is simply apples crushed and squeezed to produce a fresh tasting nectar. Apple juice, on the other hand, has been boiled and canned, sometimes made with a concentrate and water, and doesn’t have that fresh apple taste. One half bushel of apples will produce 1 1/2 gallon of cider. A variety of sweet and tart apples makes the best cider.

Fresh Apple Cider

 

Irish Skillet

Ingredients

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For the Sauce: 

  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 1/4 cup apple juice or cider
  • 2 Tablespoons white vinegar
  • 2 Tablespoons prepared yellow mustard
  • 1 Tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper

For the Skillet:

  • 1 pound lean ground beef or lamb
  • 1/2 cup diced onion
  • 2 Tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 4 slices bacon, chopped
  • 1 pound frozen hash browns or raw potatoes, chopped in 1″ pieces
  • 4 cups shredded green cabbage

Directions

In a small mixing bowl, whisk together all the sauce ingredients. Set aside.

Heat a large skillet, and brown the ground beef with the chopped onion. Add the oil, chopped bacon and frozen or fresh potatoes. (I used frozen hash browns, but next time I will use fresh chopped unpeeled potatoes. I think it would look nicer and be less mushy.) Cook uncovered over medium heat until the bacon and potatoes are starting to brown. Stir periodically to keep from sticking. Add the cabbage and the sauce and cook another 5 to 10 minutes until most of the liquid is absorbed. Serve with Irish soda bread for the real deal.

 

 

 

 

 

Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal

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Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal (2)

There is no season so vivid as fall, I believe. It makes my heart smile at this time of year to see the apples and pumpkins happily and flamboyantly flashing their reds and oranges in the sun. They are a harmonious pair, for both decorative and culinary purposes, joining hands to create a magnificent overload for the senses.

Baked oatmeal is not something we had when I was a child. My first exposure to it was at a Bible school where my husband taught at for a number of years. His workload was heavy, being Dean of men as well as teaching several courses, so I played single mama for those six weeks. Thankfully, there were several ladies who stand out in my memory as being life-savers in that time. One of them babysat my young children so that I could take a break from parenting and join the choir practice for an hour in the afternoon. She thrilled my girls when she cut out paperdolls for them and they all played together. They still remember that fondly. Another good friend knew all the good shopping spots and cool places that children would enjoy going to from her own history of being there as a young mom, and took us about town. I thank the good Lord for these people who went out of their way to make a young mother’s life easier.

Once a week, the kitchen crew would make a gigantic batch of baked oatmeal, and we staff families were allowed to take some to our temporary homes to eat at breakfast the next morning. That was always a treat! It was always the same, just a basic oats version, but it provided a delicious breakfast alternative that I didn’t have to make myself.

I usually make the plain version myself but with Thanksgiving just around the corner, I decided to dress it up a little. Enter the pumpkin and apple team. I cut back the liquid a little to accommodate the pumpkin, switched the raisins for dried cranberries, added a whole chopped Cortland apple and some cinnamon, and voila! Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal was in the oven.

Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal (5)

Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal

I like to make the oatmeal the day before and add milk before heating it all up together the next morning. It’s a perfect stick-to-your-ribs recipe for a rainy fall morning.

Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal

Cortland apples are one of my long-time favourites at this time of year. These crunchy, striped, fabulously flavoured apples with their pure white interior are highly versatile and make life so much better. 

When making your own pumpkin puree, use pie pumpkins, or sugar pumpkins, as they are sometimes called. They taste so much better. See this post for instructions on how to make your own puree. For another great breakfast recipe using pumpkins and apples, check out Pumpkin Buttermilk Waffles with Honeycrisp Apple Topping.

As always, the recipe and stories are my own. Martin’s Family Fruit Farm is my kind sponsor. 

Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal

Ingredients

Pumpkin Apple Baked Oatmeal

  • 3/4 – 1 cup brown sugar or maple syrup
  • 3 cups quick or large flake oats
  • 1/3 cup coconut
  • 1/2 cup raisins or dried cranberries
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup melted butter
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 3/4 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1 cup peeled and chopped apples

Directions

Preheat oven to 350°F (177°C). Combine brown sugar (if using maple syrup add it to the liquid ingredients), oats, coconut, raisins, baking powder, salt and cinnamon in a large bowl. Whisk eggs, then whisk in melted butter, milk, and pumpkin puree. Stir everything together, adding the chopped apples last. The texture should be sort of like a wet oatmeal cookie. Grease a 9″x 13″ pan and pour the oatmeal into it, smoothing out the top. Bake in preheated oven for 30 – 35 minutes until the edges look brown. Remove from oven and run a large spoon through it to crumble the mix. Let cool before storing in an airtight container. I like to make it the day before, then pour milk over my serving and heat it all up together in the microwave the next day. It’s perfect for those crisp fall mornings!

Dutch Apple Pie

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We are in full swing apple season at the orchard here. If you meander through, or pass our farm these days, there’s a good likelihood that you will see the triangular ladders unique to orchards propped up throughout the rows of trees. If you stop and listen, you will probably hear the chatter of the pickers as they move through, filling bin after bin of apples. After all four bins are full, the tractor pulls them off to the storage and returns with empty bins and the cycle repeats itself. Here are some pictures. I love this time of year.

These guys are picking the quintessential North American apple; the McIntosh. It seems appropriate to let you in on a little secret here. “I don’t care for Macs”, she whispers timidly. She continues, “I normally don’t eat Macs because I prefer an ultra crunchy apple”.  BUT!!! This time of year I will occasionally eat a Mac because they are actually crunchy enough and tart enough to please my finicky palate. AND I will use them in a pie because they hold their shape a little better than they will later. In keeping with sentiments of nostalgia, it has to be a Dutch Apple pie, which delights my husband. And in making the Dutch Apple pie, visions of grandmother float through my head. I can still picture her scattering the brown sugar crumbs over top, then poking holes in through the apples with the handle of a wooden spoon and slowly pouring the cream into the cavities, whistling under her breath all the while. Now I do that whistling thing, much to the annoyance of my children. It helps with high-concentration jobs like pouring cream into pies just so. Or ironing. It really helps to get that job done. I’m convinced that some day my children will remember my whistle with fondness too.

Because I was trying to pour cream out of my cute little pitcher slowly with one hand while taking a photo with the other, I got a bit too much cream into the pie so it got a little soupy. Lesson learned. Next time I’ll pre-measure the amount into my cute little pitcher. My grandma never had to take pictures of herself pouring cream so her pies were always perfect. At least they were in my memory. My pie looked good before I cut into it, though, and it still tasted good, so here it is! Yours will be perfect, I’m sure.

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The perfect Dutch Apple Pie.

Dutch Apple Pie (2)

Dutch Apple Pie (5)
The not-so-perfect but still good Dutch Apple pie.

Strategically placing the ice cream helped with the overall appearance.

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The McIntosh apple is an icon of North American orchards. It is slightly tart, slightly sweet, and very juicy. This high percentage of juice makes it a perfect sauce apple and there are McIntosh diehard fans who refuse to eat anything but a fresh Mac. It is good in pies if you like a soft apple in your pastry. Its season runs from mid-September until about May. 

This post is sponsored by Martin’s Family Fruit Farm. For more apple updates, visit their site here.

Dutch Apple Pie

Dutch Apple Pie (4)

Ingredients

  • about 7 medium apples, peeled and cut into chunks or slices to equal 4 cups
  • 4 tablespoons flour
  • 1 cup brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 3 tablespoons high fat milk or cream
  • 1 10″ unbaked pie crust (see here for a good gluten-free version)

Directions

Peel and cut apples into your desired shapes. Traditionally Dutch Apple pies are chunky. Combine flour, brown sugar, and cinnamon. Cut in the butter until the mixture is crumbly. Put the apples into the unbaked pie crust and sprinkle the crumbs evenly over top. Poke holes in top and pour the cream carefully into the holes. Bake at 375°F (190°C) for 35-45 minutes or until the apples are soft and a rich syrup has formed. Turn heat down partway through baking time if the pie is browning too fast. Best served warm or at room temperature, but it should be chilled to store overnight.

 

 

 

A Wedding and Focaccia

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This summer is packed with eventful occasions, not the least of which has been my niece’s wedding. It was held at the homeplace of the grandparents who raised her from the time she was two years old, when her birth parents were both taken from her in a freak accident. It was an outdoor wedding held in the beautiful backyard of my in-laws. The service was held on top of a hill overlooking the orchards and a soybean field. The bride was escorted up the aisle by her two older brothers, one flanking her on each side. They gave her away to her groom and I don’t believe there was a dry eye on top of that hill at that moment.

After the ceremony the guests meandered down the hill gradually to the tent where the reception was held. The gorgeous floral decorations were put together by a cousin from the South, using young little apples from our orchards and greenery. The cake was a highly successful collaborative effort between her and my sister-in-law who lives locally. I thought it was a wonderful symbol of the combined effort of the two families, one in the North and one in the South, to provide a safe haven for these young people who had lost their parents at such a young age.

A tribe of aunts, cousins and the maternal grandmother came from South Carolina early in the week to help prepare for the big day. An aunt who is gifted with organizational skills set up a plan in which we relatives took turns providing the lunches during this week of set-up. On my allotted day, I took ingredients for build-your-own-sandwiches and made focaccia that morning to assemble them on. Focaccia is essentially a slightly puffy flat bread that is drizzled with olive oil, herbs and other toppings. I have made focaccia many times as a side, but this was the first time I used it as a sandwich base. It will definitely be repeated! I cut them in rectangles, then split them in half lengthwise to layer with sandwich toppings. It was a simple but delicious repast a little out of the norm.

I grow my own herbs in pots, but we sell several varieties at Martin’s Family Fruit Farm, as well as the tomatoes, peppers, onions, lettuce, fresh garlic, and cheese. For the sandwich toppings I offered Tuscan ham, smoked turkey, cheese, sliced onions, tomatoes, peppers, lettuce, and various spreads. 

This post is sponsored by Martin’s Family Fruit Farm. The stories and recipes are my own. 

A Wedding and Focaccia

Ingredients

Dough:

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Focaccia triangles
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour or a mixture of grains and wheat flours
  • 2 teaspoons white sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon instant yeast
  • 1 1/2 cups warm water
  • 1/4 cup oil

Toppings:

  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 – 3  tablespoons grated parmesan or feta cheese
  • 3 tablespoons chopped mixed fresh herbs or 1 tablespoon dried herbs
  • 3 large garlic cloves, minced
  • generous grinding of coarse salt (about 1 teaspoon)
  • 1/2 – 1 teaspoon coarsely ground black pepper 
  • 2 medium plum tomatoes, very thinly sliced (optional)
  • 1 small red onion, thinly sliced (optional)*

Directions

Stir the dry ingredients together for the dough. Add warm water and oil and stir until well combined. It should be a soft but manageable dough. Turn out onto a well-floured surface and knead well until the dough feels springy. Cover with the bowl and let it rest for 15 minutes to half an hour. 

While the dough is resting grease a 15″x 10″ cookie pan and prepare topping ingredients. Turn on the oven to 400°F (204°C). Roll out the dough to a 16″x 11″ rectangle. Fit into the prepared pan. Dent surface of dough firmly with your fingers. Drizzle oil over top and brush to coat, allowing oil to puddle in the dents. Sprinkle with the remaining ingredients, laying tomato and onion slices on last, if using. Bake for 15 – 20 minutes or until nicely golden. Let cool for about 15 minutes before cutting into rectangles. A pizza cutter works really well for this. Cut in half for sandwiches with a serrated knife. Best served warm. 

*Sometimes I carmelize the onions for the topping. That adds a nice touch. Simply fry the onions slowly in a pan with butter until they are deep golden in colour before adding on top.