Maple and Brie Baked Apples

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Maple and Brie Baked Apples (2)

For the last few weeks our internet has been floating in Never-Never Land. Those that write blogs depend heavily on internet, for how shall they post recipes without any pictures? And how shall they load pictures without any internet? And how shall they have internet unless it is restored? Thankfully, after much trotting on various rooftops and tapping of keyboards by people who know how to trot on rooftops and tap on keyboards efficiently, we are back in the Land of Now. Just in time to squeak in another maple recipe for March.

Although baked apples go way back in time, I don’t personally have a lot of history with them myself. I remember my grandmother making them occasionally, and my mom making them occasionally, and me making them occasionally, but that’s it. So this is not an old family recipe, it’s just a great way to serve apples. It’s simple, gluten-free, easy to make for two or twelve, and… you’ve gotta admit it… kind of pretty.

But! the plate it’s on… now, that’s got history. It’s an Antique. Please repeat that phrase reverently with me. It’s an Antique! Depression-era Milk Glass, to be precise, for those of you who care as I do for old, precious dishes. My family used to own a gift shop in the village of St. Jacobs and one thing we sold was antiques. It was so much fun going with Mom and Dad to auctions to buy them and research the value of them. I am of the firm opinion that old, precious dishes are to be used and enjoyed, so it seemed right and proper that this traditional dessert should be showcased on a heritage plate.

For this recipe, I used a similar syrup as the Maple Mustard Chicken in my last post. By the way, thanks to those of you who tried that recipe and messaged to say how well you like it! That is music to a food blogger’s ears, let me tell you. I cored an Ida Red apple, stuffed it with pecans and Brie cheese and basted it with the syrup. If you prefer sweeter apples, use a Gala or something similar that holds its shape well. I always peel them halfway down, both for aesthetics and because the peel gets a little tougher from baking.

Maple and Brie Baked Apples (3)
Check out that deliciously oozing centre!

This post is sponsored by Martin’s Family Fruit Farm. The recipes, views, and stories are my own. 

Ida Reds are a favourite of many bakeries for strudels, cakes, and muffins. They are a deep red colour with a semi-tart flavour and resist browning after being cut.  

Maple and Brie Baked Apples

Ingredients

  • 2 large, firm apples (sweet or tart, your choice!)Maple and Brie Baked Apples
  • 2 Tablespoons butter
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup (I used Amber)
  • about 8 pecan halves
  • 4 Brie cheese slices

Directions

Preheat oven to 350° F. Core the apple with a thin knife (a filet knife works well) or an apple corer. Make the hole large enough to stuff with 2 slices of Brie cheese. Peel the top half of the apple. Heat the butter and maple syrup together just until it begins to boil. Place the apples in a baking pan and stick 3 pecan halves down the hole to the bottom of the apple. These help to keep the Brie inside the apple. Stuff tightly with the Brie slices, top with another pecan half, then scoop the boiling syrup over the apples. Baste the apple with the syrup from the baking dish a couple of times while baking. Bake the apples for at least an hour, or until the skin begins to split and the apple is soft to your fork, but still holding together. Place the apples on your prettiest plates and scoop the syrup from the pan over top. Serve with ice cream, if you wish.   

*Because I wanted to experience the flavours of the Brie and the maple syrup, I opted not to add cinnamon. I’m sure it would be good with cinnamon, though, so go ahead and add it if you like!

6 thoughts on “Maple and Brie Baked Apples

    Monica said:
    March 29, 2018 at 1:17 pm

    What a sweet and savory take on baked apples. That looks delicious and I can’t wait to try it. On the rare occasion that I make baked apples, it’s usually the garden variety cinnamon, raisin, and brown sugar type. This might usher in the end of that era, though. Also, congratulations for getting your post in under the wire for the month of March. You could have taken a pass and not posted at all considering all you have going on recently.

    Like

      rosekmartin responded:
      March 29, 2018 at 1:21 pm

      Thanks, Monica! I asked Steve whether it’s macabre of me to feature baked apples this month?!? He thought maybe it was. 🙂 And yes, I loved the saltiness of the creamy brie inside the apple.

      Like

    Jo said:
    March 29, 2018 at 7:39 pm

    This looks absolutely amazing. Alas…the hunk of brie I found hiding in a crisper from a month or so ago is devoured already. Your post came 3 days too late for that Brie but I know where I can get more!

    Like

      rosekmartin responded:
      March 29, 2018 at 10:33 pm

      It’s good that you do, because you’re going to want it for this!

      Like

    Eleanor katona said:
    April 11, 2018 at 4:14 pm

    Hi Rose
    I often make baked apples but I do have a question. What is an Oxford comma?
    Eleanor

    Like

      rosekmartin responded:
      April 11, 2018 at 6:27 pm

      Hi, Eleanor! Welcome to my blog!
      An Oxford comma, also known as a serial comma, is when a comma is placed before the last item in a group of three or more. An example might be “We give thanks to my parents, Lily Mae, and God”; as opposed to “We give thanks to my parents, Lily Mae and God”. In the second example it could be assumed that one’s parents were Lily Mae and God, which may be true in a spiritual sense but might be rather astounding to the reader. There have been court battles fought over a perceived misleading statement because of the lack of the Oxford comma. I kid you not. Rather safe than sorry is my motto!

      Like

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