Apple Danish Squares

Posted on Updated on

Apple Danish Squares
Apple Danish Squares

The recipe I am going to share with you today is one that has been a part of my life for many years. It’s one that comes to mind as soon as the “real apples” start coming off the trees in the fall. By real apples, I mean those that last longer than two weeks after being picked and don’t turn into apple soup when baked. It’s a recipe I clipped out of the Country magazine many years ago and keep in a little wooden recipe box. 

I like this recipe because it keeps well, freezes well, presents well, and shares well. It’s a step up from apple pie, in my opinion. However, apple pie afficionados may choose to disagree and I’m okay with that. It’s a little out of the ordinary. It does make a large panful, so you will want to make it for a group. Recently my daughter and her family were coming in from Windsor and there it was! My opportunity to bake this pastry had arrived.

It does involve a few steps, but it is so worth it. Whenever I serve it, I have flashbacks to the Gospel Echoes banquet years ago, where volunteer Mennonite girls would help to serve. The administrator was from the United States and would always request and then rave about the “square pah”. I volunteered just so I could hear him say that phrase. 

Here are the steps to making this dessert or brunch pastry. 

After your pastry is in the pan, add the apples, roll out the pastry for the cover, brush with egg white and bake. Serve it with joy to those you love.

I used Gingergold and Honeycrisp for this recipe. Cortland or any other good baking apple would also be good options.

As always, this post is sponsored by Martin’s Family Fruit Farm. The farm store renovations are nearing completions and we are all excited for its reopening.  

Apple Danish Squares

Ingredients

Pastry:

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
    Apple Danish Squares
    Apple Danish Squares
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup shortening
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1/2 cup milk

Filling:

  • 6 – 8 cups peeled and sliced baking apples
  • 1 1/2 cups white sugar
  • 1/4 cup butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg

Glaze:

  • 1 egg white, whisked with 1 teaspoon water
  • 1/2 cup icing sugar
  • 2 – 4 teaspoons milk or cream
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla

Directions

Pastry: Combine flour and salt in a medium mixing bowl. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Whisk together egg yolk and milk; add to flour mixture. Add more milk if needed to make a soft but not sticky dough that clings together. Do not overmix. Divide dough roughly in half, having one portion slightly larger than the other. On a floured surface, roll out the larger half thinly into a rectangle. It should be about 1″ bigger on all sides than your pan. Fold into quarters and carefully lift into 10″ x 15″ baking sheet. Unfold and tuck to fit up the sides, trimming and patching as necessary. Set aside and cover the other ball of dough with an upside down bowl.

Filling: Peel and slice the apples; toss them together with the remaining filling ingredients. spread them evenly over the dough in the pan. Roll out the remaining ball of dough and fit over top of the apples. Cut steam vents in whatever pattern you wish. Brush with egg white wash. Bake at 375°F (190°C) for 40 -50 minutes until golden brown and apples are soft.

Glaze: Whisk the remaining glaze ingredients together. Cool at least half an hour before drizzling with glaze. Cut into 15 or 18 squares to serve.

 

One thought on “Apple Danish Squares

    anotherdaywithjulie said:
    September 30, 2020 at 12:08 pm

    Yum!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s